All posts filed under: Adherence

Change of meds…

Eviplera to Stribild Today I am making the change from Eviplera to a newer drug which is four-in-one called Stribild. It is made up of four drugs: elvitegravir which is a type of antiretroviral called an integrase inhibitor; conicistat a “pharmacokinetic enhancer” which boosts levels of elvitegravir within the body, but has no activity against HIV; emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil which are both antiretrovirals known as nucleotide/nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) or “nukes”. A problem I had with taking Eviplera was that I kept failing to get the calorific quantity of food I needed with it, but Stribild has the benefit that it has no specific type or amount of food needed. The suggestion is to have it with a snack, or within 30 minutes of a main meal. Blood results As I tweeted earlier (from the clinic): Results from 24Nov15. – VL undetectable. CD4 333. — John [HIVBlogger] (@HIVBlogger) December 8, 2015 the results from my bloods done on 24 November 2015 were that my CD4 count was 333, and my Viral Load continues …

Maybe less than a week to go on Eviplera

It is hard to believe that it is about three-and-a-half years since I started taking Eviplera. Looking back it is clear that at the beginning I did know that it was meant to be taken with a meal, but somehow along the way I had forgotten. I had reverted to type and took it last thing at night before heading to bed. This means that it is not working as well as it should be, so the last time I was at my HIV clinic in Dublin, there is talk of me changing to a drug that does not need to be taken with food. My next appointment there is next Tuesday, so it looks like it might be less than a week to go until Eviplera is no longer part of my regime. Watch out next week to see what happens…

QUB research into stigma in gay men living with HIV

Stigma experiences, well-being and medication adherence in gay men living with HIV If you live in England, Northern Ireland, or the Republic or Ireland and are over 18 years of age, been living with HIV for over a year, and have been prescribed HA-ART medication then a researcher from Queen’s University Belfast would like 20 minutes of your time: It’s for a study exploring stigma in gay men living with HIV, and how this influences well-being and management of HIV medication. For more information click here.

Over thirty years of experience and it’s a schoolboy error that delays my day!

With a hospital appointment clashing with the funeral of a friend, today was not the day for further delays to happen during a routine appointment at the Royal Victoria Hospital. Sadly, a simple schoolboy error ended up winding me up. At least I don’t have to return for six months…

Do we get to get your autograph now…?

It has been a goal for many months, indeed it has been a goal since I was diagnosed back in March 2009. Suffice to say the goal posts have moved now… but what happened in the Royal yesterday? Up at the HIV Clinic in the Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast it was great to see new faces,  a few old ones and ones that have been there most days that I have been up. New social worker With Corinne having retired in June, there was a new social worker who has been in post for some months, he was very pleased to meet me, and I was very glad to have met him. Now I know who is responsible, if I need to contact him, I can do so. I look forward to working with him in the future. BTW his name is George. Welcome back to the consultant My HIV consultant has been off on maternity leave for quite some time, and today was the first time that I had seen her since she has …

And I nearly forgot my meds…

Having said on UTV last week about how good I have been about taking my meds, it was rather unfortunate that today I nearly forgot about them. Fortunately, of course, I had my rather wonderful husband Andrew on hand to ensure that I didn’t forget. He’s so good that my consultant at the Royal Victoria Hospital has commented in the past that she would like to prescribe an Andrew for all her patients. Well a big thank you to him and next week I should be able to report to my consultant that I’ve only missed one dose in months… I wonder what my CD4 and Viral Load counts will have been from my last visit… And of course, the vampires (nursing staff) will be wanting more bloods from me I’m sure… I just wish I could get the results a little quicker than after an interval of three—or will it be six—months.

Two busy days

Yesterday and today have been two very busy days. I’m staying with a friend over in Bedford for a little holiday. It’s respite for Andrew and me both. Yesterday, being Remembrance I was out on parade with Bedford District Scouts, and today I was with their Deputy District Commissioner at the funeral of one of the County’s Vice Presidents. Respite is always important. Those who look after others need time to recover themselves. A break from the constant care and support that is given. One difficulty for me is remembering to take my meds. I haven’t missed yet – but it is less easy than when I am at home with Andrew.